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Nort West Argentina, Something on the road & the mountains…

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frassinetti

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Joined: May 04
Points: 145
Posts: 10


Posted: 2006-03-12 23:42:00   

For those who love adventure and off the beaten track places ……. I'm just back in B's A's after an exhausting trip along the Highway Route 40 that runs both South and North of Argentina along the Andes Mountains.



Something on the road & the mountains…



It’s a difficult road to drive, goes from a good motor way all the way up to over 4000 meters in the mountains where the air is hard to breath, runs along river beds as dirt roads and in this season of summer some of the rivers are bursting with water and its near impossible to cross. All the same I was able to do it an 2 wheel drive car, without to much trouble, more to luck I think than other questions.



High up in The Mountain Rally.



Its for the idea of rally car project I'm working on, so I checked out places hotels routes and sight seeing tourist like places as well as those off the beaten track, for future use, I hope to be able to come up with a good plan for taking adventures tourist out on a 4WD trucks, and maybe why not a Carabella Kaiser Frazer.... or some other vintage car like a Kaiser built jeep Willy here in Argentina.



I wonder if any of you have driven vintage cars…..



We had a fantastic time, sleeping in really some very nice hotels, comfortable ones, as well as one owned by the US actor Robert Duval. He married a woman from Argentina.



The scenery goes without saying was supreme, from low flat lands to high mountains, dry weather, and strong sun shine; cool in the shade as well at night. Fantastic the scenery of the country side........ to incredible old mud houses used still by the natives of this continent......as to future trips, I will be working out the idea some more and let you know... maybe you will want to come some other time.



Bob Frassinetti, Buenos Aires, Argentina





Here you can see some photos of the trip: http://www.flickr.com/photos/frassinetti/sets/1821657/

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Everything on Art & Antiques as well as Travel Information for Buenos Aires and Argentina by Bob Frassinetti


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frassinetti

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Joined: May 04
Points: 145
Posts: 10


Posted: 2006-05-09 23:34:00   

By the way if you want to see some amazing photos of different parts of the Ruta 40, both Patagonia and the North West of Argentina follow this link……



http://www.flickr.com/groups/route40/ Bob Frassinetti

---
Everything on Art & Antiques as well as Travel Information for Buenos Aires and Argentina by Bob Frassinetti


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frassinetti

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Joined: May 04
Points: 145
Posts: 10


Posted: 2006-05-09 23:36:00   

And if you wonder what’s the story behind the road side sanctuaries.....



Road sanctuaries along the high roads of Argentina, have you ever seen these road side sanctuaries…… Road sanctuaries go hand in hand with the Christian idea of pilgrims. We can trace the origin of this particular religious tradition to the middle Ages, when the European gentlemen and monarchs fought in the crusades against the Muslims, and wished to return to holly land in Jerusalem. It was then when peregrination had its first and strongest impact. Going to Santiago de Compostela in Spain, to Rome, to Jerusalem, was a synonym of going through a self discovery path that strengthened the bond with god and the Holly Church.







In the American continent, especially during the Hispanic conquest Church and Sword were two sides of the same coin, it wasn’t just about the territories, but also it had much to do with spreading around the pagan world the word of God. And due to the fact that there were many ancestral indigenous religions that were not easy to eradicate, the form the colonization of the soul took was a blend between Christianity and local religions. Catholicism was, from the very start, the main stream in which diverse and local cults converged. The mean through which these different religions connected were the Christian Saints, people who looked just like us but had lived an exemplar life of such divinity, of such clearness of heart and soul that they had come to be closer to God, and after dead have professed all sort of miracles. These sanctified common people were the link through which priests and nuns spread the gospel. As a result of this, Saints have had a central role in popular beliefs soon after the first evangelization campaigns took place in Latin America.







This general evolution Hispanic American Catholicism remains intact to our days. And it’s important to highlight the fact that there are thousands of Saints created by the communities, many of which have not yet been recognized by the Vatican, and however are the essential bond these common people have with the Church as an institution.







In Argentina, among the most important and popular ones are road Saints, saints to the voyagers… common people, like you and me, who have not lived an exemplar life, but have died martyrs and professed miracles at their moment of death and have kept on doing so for the years to come. Two of the most worshiped popular saints in Argentina are Difunta Correa and Gauchito Gil, both guardians to voyagers and travelers.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/frassinetti/sets/1822132/



I will try to place some photos of the ones I photographed along the Route 40, North West Argentina, in my travels this summer……… Bob Frassinetti





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Everything on Art & Antiques as well as Travel Information for Buenos Aires and Argentina by Bob Frassinetti


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