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Better wording or spelling

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rangutan

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Posted: 2008-02-15 20:43:00   

Just a small one pointed out by a new member:

In the forum one can edit ones own entry but this is not clear because the item to click on is "Contact edit/delete entry" instead of two buttons "Edit" and "Delete" or one button "contact/delete".

What is "contact edit entry or "Contact delete entry" really ??? RR

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Rudolf "Rangutan" Graspointner


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andreas

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Posted: 2008-02-18 11:42:00   

Hello Rudi,



thank you for your hint with the "Contact Edit/Delete this post". This was an error that found its way into GLOBO with a search and replace function I used.



Best regards,



andy


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rangutan

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Posted: 2008-02-18 13:26:00   

Thanks Andy!



New place! This is another one that confuses a lot of new members: Perhaps a second button can be incorporated under the input mask, not all members look to the right. This confused me too when I joined GLOBO and we have queries regulaly. I wrote to Krys:



.".... to create a new place in the GLOBOdatabank you must be logged on, the click under the menu "Upload" > "Pictures" and to the right of the input mask you will see a button "suggest a new city". What is meant there is "suggest a new place" because you can suggest also the names of towns, villages, beaches, islands, lakes, mountains ..... " I wish that button (option) would be clearer, a lot of new members ask about this.



See also the F.A.Q. forum thread:

http://www.globosapiens.net/topic-how-to...-add-a-new-place_34_1632_0000.html

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Rudolf "Rangutan" Graspointner


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rangutan

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Posted: 2008-03-11 13:30:00   

A new observation: When one surfs GLOBOsapiens as a non-member one is suddenly asked to "sign up" and do a "signing up" procedure. Most people don't like to "sign" for anything, some not before they ask their lawyer if it is OK! There are sayings in every language, "let the signer beware". We loose new members because of this wording I think. The words there should be "register" and "registration" just like other websites do and one can remark; "... the registration procedure is easy, uncomplicated, safe and quick...."

RRG

[ This Message was edited by: rangutan on 2008-03-11 13:33 ]

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Rudolf "Rangutan" Graspointner


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andreas

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Posted: 2008-03-12 08:29:00   

Hello rudi,



I believe that you are wrong. "sign up" is perfect English in my understanding for the registration process. Many other websites do the same, including google and last.fm. Try a search on "sign up" on a search engine and you will see how many sites are using this wording.



Please correct me if I am mistaken.



Best regards,



andy




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krisek

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Posted: 2008-03-13 01:33:00   

Hi,



'sign up' is a phrasal verb (and I would not call it the best English, actually), which means join, enroll or register. Although they mean exactly the same (there might be semantics, though), phrasal verbs are not used by the Queen unless the best alternative is imprecise.



Best regards,

Krys

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Open your eyes. Free your mind. Touch lives. Sink into the different. Travel and belong. Profile photo: Palma de Mallorca.


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rangutan

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Posted: 2008-03-13 08:37:00   

I see the problem now, "sign up" is US-English which webmasters are usually accustomed to and it is not wrong. Do not confuse with "sign in" which is often an alternative to "login", like one signs a log at security when entering an important building or facility. Google actualy uses "create an account" for new members, not "sign up" but msn, yahoo, youtube, facebook and other USA based services do.



In International English and UK-English we use the term "register" or "create an account". Examples: yahoo.de, ebay.co.uk, autotrader.co.uk, futureshop.ca, smh.com.au etc.....



It is your decision but do consider that 65% (two thirds) of our members are from the EU or Commonwealth countries and only 25% from the USA and dependancies .

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Rudolf "Rangutan" Graspointner


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rangutan

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Posted: 2009-08-23 19:51:00   

Hi andy
When upgrading an account better english would be without "did" (2x)?
"You did successfully upgrade ... We did already activate the extra features...." should be ""You have successfully upgraded ... We have activated the extra features...."
"... trusting " should be "supporting".
http://www.globosapiens.net/account/index.php?fuseaction=txt&msg=upgrade_ok
GRR

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Rudolf "Rangutan" Graspointner


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jacko1

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Posted: 2009-08-23 21:44:00   

As a native born English speaker, the terms pub or bar have different connotations to other people, other than 'the pub' we often refer to these places as 'watering holes' so how confusing is that when the last thing we want is water, but it does help to differentiate between a place primarily for food or cocktails etc and a place to get a beer or wine. Regards, Tony.

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horourke


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Posted: 2009-08-24 13:38:00   

Well said tony.
All languages are heavily nuanced by the location of growing up, social bakground and travel experience of the speaker.
English being the modern-day equivalent of Latin is the property of people from places as diverse as Tyneside (Geordie), Belfast, Pitcairn Island, Canada where in Newfoundland it is spoken with a Wexford accent and good old Dublin, Ireland where the odd word from viking invasions still holds a tentative foot-hold.

Fifty years ago it was a sign of erudition to corectly use the noun "myriad" as in A myriad stars. Now the misuse a myriad os stars has become correct through usage.

It is good to see Rudi taking up these issues and extending the opportunity for discussion.

I note from one Geordie site that "Gan" (to go) is suggested to be related to german gehen

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Hugh


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